AI in Academic Medicine Webinar Series

With artificial intelligence (AI) offering so many opportunities across academic medicine, the AAMC is convening and connecting our community. This free webinar series will share strategies and exemplars in the field to help grow your knowledge and advance your practice.

This learning series will explore critical concepts, the current landscape, and practical strategies drawn from various perspectives and institutions to support you in navigating the evolving world of AI in academic medicine. Sessions will feature resources and best practices that you can apply across various settings, as well as time for Q&A with the featured speakers.

This series includes one webinar a month through August of 2024. When you register, we will notify you as we add each new offering. If you register, and can't attend the live webinar, you will have access to the archive recording.

"AI in Medical Education: Using the Missions of Medical Education as a Guide"
January 23 at 3 pm ET
Join us to equip yourself with the insights and tools needed to position yourself knowledgeably in conversations regarding AI’s place in medical education. Using the missions of medical education as our guide, we’ll navigate its opportunities throughout the continuum of medical education.

“Building Trust & Transparency in the Age of AI: Behind the Data Curtain”
February 28 at 3 pm ET
AI models are reliant upon the data that trains and fuels them. It is important for issues around data management, governance and ethics to be considered in any decision about utilizing AI. Panelists will share how they are addressing concerns about the utilization of AI tools, by highlighting best practices and sharing practical examples on how to leverage the tools and support innovation while also protecting learner and patient data, addressing bias and building strong data governance policies and procedures.

“Artificial Intelligence and Healthcare Delivery: Navigating the Clinical Reality and Expectations”
March 26 at 3 pm ET
In this session, panelists will explore the utilization of AI in the clinical space and the importance of preparing the future generation of physicians, who will navigate a healthcare landscape where AI is even more integrated than today. Our discussion will also explore what level of AI awareness and experience program directors and DIOs are expecting their new residents to begin their graduate medical education.

“Utilizing AI for the Medical Education Classroom”
April 30 at 3 pm ET
AI is transforming medical education, with applications as an active tool within the classroom, as well as for curriculum development, assessment, study tools, communication skills development and much more. During this session, panelists will explore emerging applications of AI that impact the classroom, including the development and delivery of curriculum and the assessment of learning. Examples will be shared from varying perspectives and institutions, including content creation, study tools, communication development, and use of AI for methodologies such as case-based learning and simulation. We’ll also examine the possibility of AI-driven assessment technologies, shedding light on practical uses and where they have potential in the comprehensive evaluation of both students and components of educational programs.

“AI in Medical Education: Faculty as Learners and Educators”
May 22 at 3 pm ET
Utilization of AI in the classroom hinges on knowledgeable faculty and staff. This webinar focuses on the important role and practical implementation of faculty development around essential understandings of emergent AI’s tools and capabilities in this rapidly changing environment. Panelists will share practical examples of how they are educating faculty about institutional decisions related to the incorporation of AI, ensuring they are well-informed and equipped to utilize AI tools, and guide learners and patients effectively in this evolving educational and clinical environment.

“A Disruptive Connector: Learning & Experimenting with Generative AI Together”
June 11 @ 12 pm ET
In this webinar, participants will learn how collaborators from Mayo Clinic and Karolinska Institutet worked together to provide an opportunity for international medical educators to learn with and from one another about generative AI while using generative AI in a supportive, inclusive environment. They leveraged experiential learning to foster digital mindsets and adaptive expertise while wrestling with non-linear, complex challenges facing medical education. More than 450 colleagues from over 30 different geographical locations registered for the event; many of whom participated in one or more of the three synchronous virtual sessions. A dynamic resource rich website was created to encourage continuous engagement and co-construction of knowledge and skills beyond the 24 hours of the event.

“Leveraging AI to Support Operational Functions”
June 25 @ 2 pm ET
Emerging technologies have the potential to support more than teaching and learning or clinical care, including creating efficiencies for everyday tasks, improving workflows, reducing cognitive load and weeding out redundant tasks or information. As AI is leveraged across schools, this webinar will explore how institutions are implementing AI behind the scenes to support administration, business decisions, and more.

“AI for Medical School Admissions”
July 30 @ 3 pm ET
The use of AI in medical school admissions and residency selection is a complex and dynamic topic of significant interest to the medical education community. Given the immense care and intentionality schools rightfully invest in this area, considerable thought and evaluation of any incorporated tools must be taken. In this session, we will explore how several institutions are thinking about the impact AI may have on programs and how, or if, they might seek to utilize it.

“Leveraging AI for Research”
August 27 @ 3 pm ET
This panel webinar will provide a practical approach to creating AI focused partnerships, including advice, lessons learned and best practices. Specific examples of how various sized institutions have developed collaborations with industry and government partners to harness the power of AI in medicine will be shared by each panelist, including questions for other institutions to consider when thinking about entering their own partnerships (ex. alignment with institutional mission & strategy, student data protections, data storage and management, privacy/compliance, etc.).

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 07/30/2024 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    The use of AI in medical school admissions is a complex and dynamic topic of significant interest to the medical education community. Speakers from diverse institutions and in different roles related to these processes will share learnings, summarize internal discussions, and detail initiatives underway locally and nationally.

    The use of AI in medical school admissions and residency selection is a complex and dynamic topic of significant interest to the medical education community. Given the immense care and intentionality schools rightfully invest in this area, considerable thought and evaluation of any incorporated tools must be taken. In this session, we will explore how several institutions are thinking about the impact AI may have on programs and how, or if, they might seek to utilize it. Speakers from diverse institutions and in different roles related to these processes will share learnings, summarize internal discussions, and detail initiatives underway locally and nationally.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Understand the evolving landscape of AI integration in medical school admissions and residency selection, including the motivations, challenges, and considerations guiding institutional decisions.
    2. Analyze the potential impacts of AI on processes within medical education institutions, exploring both the opportunities and risks associated with its implementation.
    3. Evaluate various perspectives and strategies employed by different institutions and stakeholders in navigating the adoption of AI tools, fostering critical thinking and informed decision-making regarding their utilization in admissions and selection.

    Ioannis Koutroulis, MD, PhD, MBA

    Associate Dean of MD Admissions
    Co-Director, MD Program Clinical and Translational Research Scholarly Concentration
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Emergency Medicine, Genomics and Precision Medicine
    George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences

    Ioannis Koutroulis, MD, PhD, MBA, is the associate dean of MD admissions at George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences providing overall leadership in medical student admissions and strategic direction and priorities for the admissions program. Additionally, he is the co-Director of the Clinical and Translational Research Scholarly Concentration for the MD program, an Associate Professor of pediatrics, emergency medicine, genomics and precision medicine and a practicing pediatric emergency medicine physician and an NIH-funded principal investigator. He is a widely published scientist, publishing work on sepsis, obesity, and encephalopathy in many high-impact, peer reviewed journals. His research focuses on the use of AI/ML and Natural Language Processing for early identification and treatment of pediatric sepsis. He aims to use the same technology in MD admissions for a fair and efficient selection process. He is the recipient of several research and teaching awards and a member of numerous national committees on research and medical education.

    Richard N. Landers, PhD

    John P. Campbell Distinguished Professor of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
    University of Minnesota - Twin Cities

    Richard N. Landers, PhD, is the John P. Campbell Distinguished Professor of Industrial-Organizational Psychology at the University of Minnesota and Principal Investigator of TNTLAB (Testing New Technologies in Learning, Assessment and Behavior). His academic research concerns the use of innovative technologies like artificial intelligence, machine learning, games, gamification, and virtual reality, to improve psychometric assessment, employee selection, adult learning, and research methods. He is a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, American Psychological Association, and Association for Psychological Science. His work appears primarily in psychology and interdisciplinary human-computer interaction journals. He is the incoming editor of the American Psychological Association’s Technology, Mind, and Behavior, an interdisciplinary journal at the intersection of psychology and computer science. He is author of two textbooks and has developed two edited scholarly volumes. He has been featured in the popular press, including Forbes, Business Insider, and Popular Science.

    Laurah Turner, PhD, MA

    Assistant Dean of Assessment and Evaluation, Office of Medical Education
    Assistant Professor, Department of Medical Education
    University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

    Dr. Laurah Turner is an Assistant Dean of Assessment and Evaluation in the Office of Medical Education and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medical Education at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Her research focuses on leveraging artificial intelligence (AI), to advance medical education assessment, personalize learning experiences, and address disparities in training. Dr. Turner's work aims to develop assessment tools and systems that provide insights into students' readiness for residency. She is dedicated to advancing and actualizing precision medical education by tailoring learning experiences to individual needs and styles. In her AI system development, Dr. Turner emphasizes interpretability, robustness, and scalable oversight to ensure the trustworthiness and adaptability of these tools.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 06/25/2024 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    As AI is leveraged across schools, this webinar will explore how institutions are implementing AI behind the scenes to support administration, business decisions, and more.

    Emerging technologies have the potential to support more than teaching and learning or clinical care, including creating efficiencies for everyday tasks, improving workflows, reducing cognitive load and weeding out redundant tasks or information. As AI is leveraged across schools, this webinar will explore how institutions are implementing AI behind the scenes to support administration, business decisions, and more.

    Rebecca Canino, MBA

    Executive Director of Telemedicine
    Johns Hopkins Health System

    John Morgan

    IT Associate Director
    Southern Illinois University School of Medicine

    John Morgan is an Associate Director of Information Technology at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, leading SIU’s Systems Administration team, Service Desk, and distributed technical support team.  John is a 2020 graduate of the GIR Leadership Institute, a current member of the GIR Steering Committee, and hosts the GIR’s IT Operations quarterly call series.

    Ahmad Rezazadeh

    Manager, Network Engineering
    Stanford Health Care

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/11/2024

    In this webinar, participants will learn how collaborators from Mayo Clinic and Karolinska Institutet worked together to provide an opportunity for international medical educators to learn with and from one another about generative AI while using generative AI in a supportive, inclusive environment.

    This webinar, hosted by the Group on Information Resources (GIR), was presented as a poster at the 2024 Information Technology in Academic Medicine Conference in New Orleans. Because of its timely focus, it was chosen to be put forth as part our GIR Programming that this Group hosts throughout the year. Below is the description of what participants will learn about during this webinar, and there will be time for Q&A at the end.

    Experiential learning is essential to foster a digital mindset and adaptive expertise in applying generative AI to teaching and learning. In this dynamic environment, where human and machine interactions are accelerating, we must maintain focus on collaborative intelligence and fusion skill development to facilitate building digital capabilities. Leveraging the power of technology, we can come together globally to learn from each other, seek support and collaborate through synchronous and asynchronous means.

    In this webinar, participants will learn how collaborators from Mayo Clinic and Karolinska Institutet worked together to provide an opportunity for international medical educators to learn with and from one another about generative AI while using generative AI in a supportive, inclusive environment. They leveraged experiential learning to foster digital mindsets and adaptive expertise while wrestling with non-linear, complex challenges facing medical education. More than 450 colleagues from over 30 different geographical locations registered for the event; many of whom participated in one or more of the three synchronous virtual sessions. A dynamic resource rich website was created to encourage continuous engagement and co-construction of knowledge and skills beyond the 24 hours of the event.

    Heather Billings, PhD, MA
    Director, Faculty Development
    Mayo Clinic

    Henrika Florén, MEd, MA
    Education Developer
    Karolinska Institutet

    Elissa Hall, EdD, MA
    Director, Learning and Technology Innovation
    Mayo Clinic

    Andrew Maunder, MSc
    Educational Technologist
    Karolinska Institutet

    Teresa Sörö, MSc, RN
    Director, Continuous Learning and Professional Development
    Karolinska Institutet

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    Utilization of AI in the classroom hinges on knowledgeable faculty and staff. This webinar focuses on the important role and practical implementation of faculty development around essential understandings of emergent AI’s tools and capabilities in this rapidly changing environment.

    Utilization of AI in the classroom hinges on knowledgeable faculty and staff. This webinar focuses on the important role and practical implementation of faculty development around essential understandings of emergent AI’s tools and capabilities in this rapidly changing environment. Panelists will share practical examples of how they are educating faculty about institutional decisions related to the incorporation of AI, ensuring they are well-informed and equipped to utilize AI tools, and guide learners and patients effectively in this evolving educational and clinical environment.

    Nathan M. Cross, MD, MS, CIIP, DABR

    Associate Professor, Neuroradiology
    Vice Chair of Informatics
    University of Washington

    Diego Niño, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Physiology
    Department of Medical Education
    University of Texas at Tyler School of Medicine

    Diego F. Niño, MD, PhD is an Associate Professor of Physiology in the Department of Medical Education at The University of Texas at Tyler School of Medicine in Tyler, TX. In addition to his faculty role, he serves on the USMLE Physiology and Cell Biology Test Material Development Committee for the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME). Dr. Niño is a scholar and faculty of the Harvard Macy Institute Transforming your Teaching using Technology Course and a founding member of the International Association of Medical Science Educators (IAMSE) Artificial Intelligence subcommittee. His academic and research interests are focused on developing and implementing innovative strategies to deliver technology-enhanced educational experiences within the medical education curriculum. He focuses on advancing medical education through implementing active learning strategies, creating interactive tools that enhance student learning, incorporating educational technology and artificial intelligence.

    Akshay Sood, MD, MPH

    Assistant Dean, Mentoring and Faculty Retention
    Interim Director, Faculty Academic Affairs
    University of New Mexico School of Medicine

    Akshay Sood, the interim Director of Faculty Affairs at the UNM HSC, is a tenured Distinguished Professor, Regents Professor, and the founding Miners’ Colfax Medical Center Endowed Chair at the University of New Mexico’s School of Medicine. Dr. Sood received his postdoctoral fellowship in Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Occupational and Environmental Medicine at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.  

    Passionate about the role of mentoring junior faculty, he leads the UNM HSC Faculty Mentor Development Program which has been adopted by 13 institutions across seven states. He is the Assistant Dean of Mentoring and Faculty Retention at the UNM School of Medicine Office of Faculty Affairs and Career Development and past Associate Director of the Mentoring Core of the Mountain West-CTR-IN Professional Development Core. He is a national expert on faculty development and retention, with presentations at the UNM Mentoring Conference/AAMC. His current research interest is on the assessment of the institutional mentoring climate, strategies to improve underrepresented faculty retention, and innovative mentor development initiatives. He is the P.I. of a multi-institutional U01 grant on the “Effectiveness of Innovative Research Mentor Interventions among Underrepresented Minority Faculty in the Southwest (NIGMS U01GM132175-01)”.

     

    Eric Weissman

    Senior Director, Faculty and Academic Society Engagement
    AAMC

    Eric serves as senior director of faculty and academic society engagement for the Washington-based Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). In this role, Eric manages the day-to-day operations of the Council of Faculty and Academic Societies, or CFAS, one of the AAMC’s three governing bodies. CFAS represents the interests of medical school faculty and academic societies within the AAMC’s membership. Among key issues covered are faculty wellbeing and resilience, sexual and gender harassment, diversity in academic medicine, advancement of science and research within academic medicine, graduate medical education, faculty definition and identity, and the role and impact of medical school faculty within clinical, research, and educational settings.

    Eric is also the principal writer and editor of the weekly “CFAS News” publication, which goes to more than 5,000 subscribers representing leaders in academic medicine, media, health policy.

    Eric previously served for a decade as senior director of publishing services in the Communication cluster at the AAMC, overseeing the AAMC website, its creative and editorial services division, and its publishing efforts. Eric additionally has a long history in science and medical communications, having held an array of leadership positions at organizations such as Stanford School of Medicine, Veterinary Centers of America, WebMD, and other organizations focused on consumer health, medicine, and science. Eric also has worked as a writer and editor for Congressional Quarterly and Time Life Books.

    Jinjie Zheng, PhD, MS, MA

    Assistant Dean, Digital Technology
    Morehouse School of Medicine

    Dr. Jinjie Zheng is an Associate Professor in the Department of Medical Education and serves as the Assistant Dean for Digital Technology at Morehouse School of Medicine. She is dedicated to advancing health equity through digital learning and has been pivotal in creating innovative and effective digital learning solutions for both students and faculty. Dr. Zheng's research interests include educational technology in academic medicine, digital dissemination of health equity, and the development of medical faculty technology. Currently, she is leading the Digital Health Educator initiative at the institution, funded by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA).

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/30/2024

    AI is transforming medical education, with applications as an active tool within the classroom, as well as for curriculum development, assessment, study tools, communication skills development and much more. During this session, panelists will explore emerging applications of AI that impact the classroom, including the development and delivery of curriculum and the assessment of learning.

    AI is transforming medical education, with applications as an active tool within the classroom, as well as for curriculum development, assessment, study tools, communication skills development and much more. During this session, panelists will explore emerging applications of AI that impact the classroom, including the development and delivery of curriculum and the assessment of learning. Examples will be shared from varying perspectives and institutions, including content creation, study tools, communication development, and use of AI for methodologies such as case-based learning and simulation. We’ll also examine the possibility of AI-driven assessment technologies, shedding light on practical uses and where they have potential in the comprehensive evaluation of both students and components of educational programs.

    Latha Chandran, MD, MPH, MBA

    Executive Dean for Education and Policy Founding Chair, Department of Medical Education, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

    Dr. Latha Chandran is the Executive Dean and the Founding Chair of the Department of Medical Education at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Nationally, she served as past President of the Academic Pediatric Association and as past Vice Chair of the National Board of Medical Examiners. 

    Dr. Chandran received her medical degree from Trivandrum Medical College in India, her MPH from Johns Hopkins University, and her MBA from the University of Miami. She served in various leadership roles at Renaissance School of Medicine Stony Brook University, most recently as the Vice Dean for Academic and Faculty Affairs and the Miriam and David Donoho Distinguished Teaching Professor.  In addition to educational scholarship, her writings have focused on Professional Identity Formation among medical students and Humanism in Medicine.  A tenured educator scholar who has received numerous teaching awards, Dr Chandran is the founding co-director of a national award-winning three-year faculty development program- the Educational Scholars Program- for junior pediatric educators. Dr Chandran’s additional areas of interest include technology and artificial intelligence in education.

    Kathleen Everling, PhD

    Senior Medical Educator, Office of Educational Development Adjunct, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Health

    Kathleen M. Everling, PhD, is an educator with experience at all levels of education, having worked in K-12 and higher education as a faculty member and administrator before transitioning to medical education. Dr. Everling received her MA in Cross-Cultural Communications from the University of Houston-Clear Lake, MEd in Educational Psychology, and PhD in Education Curriculum and Instruction from Texas A&M University. She is the medical educator responsible for the course and program evaluations for the John Sealy School of Medicine. She is the co-director of the TechTime faculty development series on technology utilization in education for the school of medicine. Dr. Everling also serves as a faculty member in UTMB’s Scholars in Education program, an 18-month faculty development program. In addition, Dr. Everling has conducted workshops and presentations at local, regional, national, and international conferences and meetings on a variety of educational topics, including incorporating AI into health professions education.

    Ronald Rodriguez, MD, PhD

    Professor, Henry B. & Edna S. Dielmann Memorial Professor of Urologic Science, UT Health San Antonio

    Dr. Ronald Rodriguez received his BS degree in Life Sciences from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1984. He obtained his Ph.D. in Cell Biology from Baylor College of Medicine in 1990, and his MD from Baylor College of Medicine in 1992 as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program. After medical school, Dr. Rodriguez entered Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1992 and completed his residency and fellowship training in 1998. He subsequently stayed on faculty at Johns Hopkins from 1999-2012. During his last seven years at Johns Hopkins, he was the program director for urology training. In January 2013, he left Johns Hopkins to become the Henry B. and Edna Smith Dielmann Memorial Professor of Urologic Science at the UTHSCSA and Chair of the Department of Urology. In 2017 he became the interim Dean for the UTHSA School of Medicine. In 2018, he developed end stage renal disease, and step down from leadership positions for health reasons. He subusequently limited his clinical duties and focused on medical education. He joined the Department of Medical Education, and initiated a program in Artificial Intelligence, culminating in the nations first dual degree program MD/MSAI. Dr. Rodriguez is a highly experienced urologic surgeon with expertise in urologic oncology, particularly focusing on prostate and kidney cancer. He is a world expert in the use of cryoablative technologies for kidney and recurrent prostate cancer. He is also an expert in the care of urologic cancer patients, including kidney, prostate, bladder, testes and adrenal cancers. He currently has limited clinical duties in urologic oncology, general office urology, hypogonadism (low testosterone), sexual dysfunction and urinary difficulties. In addition to his clinical practice, he maintains an active research laboratory with interests in the role of oxidative damage in the development of aggressive kidney cancer, immune regulation of kidney cancer, health disparities research, community outreach particularly with education of underserved students, and the use of AI as a means of augmenting medical education, medical research and clinical support.

    Annelise M. Silva, MD EdM

    National President, The American Medical Student Association

    Annelise M. Silva is the National President of the American Medical Student Association (AMSA). She is a recent graduate of the Boonshoft School of Medicine at Wright State University and obtained her Master of Education in Curriculum and Teaching with an emphasis in general science education from the Wheelock College of Education and Human Development at Boston University. She is an alumna of the Teach for America corps in Massachusetts, a former PIER scholar of the American College of Radiology, and was the founding Vice Chair of the Young and Empowered Women’s Association. In addition to her role at AMSA, she serves on the visual abstract editorial team of RadioGraphics and is the student co-lead of the Society of Abdominal Radiology Medical Student Outreach Committee (SARMO). Annelise’s research has mostly focused on the assessment of bioimaging markers for personalized radiogenomics and the design/implementation of various radiology education pathway initiatives for medical students.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/26/2024

    In this session, panelists will explore the utilization of AI in the clinical space and the importance of preparing the future generation of physicians, who will navigate a healthcare landscape where AI is even more integrated than today.

    In this session, panelists will explore the utilization of AI in the clinical space and the importance of preparing the future generation of physicians, who will navigate a healthcare landscape where AI is even more integrated than today. Our discussion will also explore what level of AI awareness and experience program directors and DIOs are expecting their new residents to begin their graduate medical education. This session will encourage discussion that illuminates the changing paradigms regarding students' AI education from a postgraduate medical and clinical viewpoint, and how undergraduate medical education may need to change to keep up. This session will help contextualize these rapidly evolving possibilities within existing clinical structures and technology platforms (e.g., electronic health records).

    Keith Horvath, MD

    Senior Director, Clinical Transformation, AAMC

    Keith A. Horvath is Sr. Director, Clinical Transformation in Health Care Affairs at the Association of American Medical Colleges. Most recently he was Director of the Cardiothoracic Surgery Research Program for the National Heart, Lung, Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health and Chief, Cardiothoracic Surgery at Suburban Hospital, an affiliate of Johns Hopkins Medical Center. Prior to this position he was an Associate Professor of Surgery and a Program Director at Northwestern University, Chicago Illinois. Trained in general and cardiothoracic surgery at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dr. Horvath is a graduate of the University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine. 

    As Sr. Director, Clinical Transformation he works with a team dedicated to improving outcomes at academic medical centers and their affiliates across the US. This includes assisting institutions shifting to value-based care as directed via CMS/CMMI alternative payment models and bundling initiatives. He has a longstanding interest in clinical care improvement with over 20 years’ service on the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database; Coding & Nomenclature; and Health Policy Committees. This interest extends to clinical training as he serves as the AAMC Representative to the ACGME and co-leads the AAMC Group on Resident Affairs.

    Professionally, Dr. Horvath has represented the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the American Association of Thoracic Surgeons to CMS, FDA, RUC, PEAC and Congress. A founding member of the Maryland Cardiac Surgery Quality Initiative, he has also served the Maryland Health Care Commission as a member of its Clinical Advisory Group that rewrote the legislation that governs cardiac care for the State. Additionally he has served on over 20 national committees, 10 editorial boards, and garnered over 25 million dollars in research funding.

    Finally, Dr. Horvath has performed over 6,000 cardiac operations, has authored and coauthored over 280 publications and logged over 89,000 miles watching, playing and coaching soccer games

    Tauhid Mahmud, MD, MPH

    Dr. Mahmud serves as a preventive medicine resident at Stony Brook University, following the completion of his family medicine residency at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC). He obtained his medical degree from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and his Master of Public Health from Columbia University, with a specialization in Health Policy and Management. Dr. Mahmud played a central role in establishing the Health Justice Track at the UMMC Family & Community Medicine residency program, aimed at educating residents on health disparities, and received the Resident Teacher of the Year award in recognition of his contributions. Dr. Mahmud served as Co-chair of Communications at SAPHA, a nonprofit organization dedicated to addressing public health issues impacting the South Asian community in the US and was responsible for multi-channel media campaigns highlighting relevant public health issues.  He has been appointed as an Associate Editor for AJPM Focus where he oversees clinical preventive medicine, integrative medicine, and lifestyle medicine submissions. Currently, he is pursuing a graduate certificate in clinical informatics at Stony Brook University and engaged in projects that explore the utilization of natural language processing in primary care.

    Shakaib (Shak) Rehman, MD, MACP, CSH, FACH, FAMIA, FEACH

    Dr. Rehman is the Chief of Education & Founding Director of Academic Practice at the Phoenix VA Healthcare Systems. He also serves as the Chair/Professor of Department of Informatics, Professor of Humanism & Internal Medicine, Chair of Admissions Committee & Graduate Medical Education Committee at the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix. He helped founded the Informatics fellowship and is a frequent speaker at the Informatics association’s meetings. He is also serving in the GRA Steering committee and the Chair of Policy & Advocacy Committee of International Association on Communication in Healthcare (EACH) and American College of Physicians (ACP) AZ Chapter. He has served as the President of the Society of General Internal Medicine Mountain Region; Vice-President of the Academy on Communications in Healthcare (ACH); & Conference Chair for the International Conference on Communication in Healthcare (ICCH). He has been awarded the Master of the American College of Physicians, Fellow of EACH, AMIA And ACH, the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society best teacher award and Gold Humanism Honor Society award. He has received >100 teaching/mentoring awards & published hundreds of articles/book chapters.

    Mary Kate Selling, MHA

    Executive Director of Clinical Data and Analytics, UChicago Medicine

    Mary Kate Selling, MHA, is the Executive Director of Clinical Data and Analytics. Reporting to the System CMO, her focus is on turning data into action. Her portfolio includes Data Science, Clinical Analytics & Visualization, Regulatory Reporting, Health Information Management (HIM) and Clinical Documentation Improvement (CDI). In addition, she oversees the Data and Analytics Steering Committee focused on Data Strategy and Governance. She also serves as co-chair of the Analytics Intervention Unit which provides strategic direction and operational support for all predictive and interventional models that impact patient care. In particular, the AIU has served to set standards around validation and evaluation for model bias as part of the critical process when turning on AI within the clinical setting. She has her B.S. in Clinical Laboratory Science from Marquette University and MHA from the University of Minnesota.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 02/28/2024

    Panelists will share how they are addressing data and ethics related concerns about the utilization of AI tools by highlighting best practices.

    AI models are reliant upon the data that trains and fuels them. It is important for issues around data management, governance, and ethics to be considered in any decision about utilizing AI. Panelists will share how they are addressing data and ethics related concerns about the utilization of AI tools by highlighting best practices and sharing practical examples on how to leverage the tools and support innovation, while also protecting learner and patient data, addressing bias, and building strong data governance policies and procedures.

    Lynn Cleary, MD

    Vice President of Academic Affairs

    Upstate Medical University

    Dr. Lynn Cleary is Professor of Medicine at SUNY Upstate Medical University, SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor, Upstate’s Vice President for Academic Affairs, and a member of the University Executive Committee. In addition to seeing patients and teaching, she collaborates with deans and faculty on educational program planning, learner assessment, program evaluation, university accreditation, institutional effectiveness, interprofessional education, and the university simulation center. Dr. Cleary is a Master of the American College of Physicians, past President of the New York chapter of the American College of Physicians, Honorary Member for Life of the National Board of Medical Examiners, and Past President of the Board of Directors of Alpha Omega Alpha.

    Cecilia Barry, JD

    Senior Corporate Counsel

    AAMC

    Cecilia Barry, JD, is Senior Corporate Counsel at the AAMC where she provides in-house legal counsel to the AAMC’s programs and staff, focusing on data privacy and security, technology, transactional, global, and research issues. Cecilia manages the AAMC’s privacy program where she drafts and implements policies, trains staff, prepares for and responds to data incidents, and consults with new business, research, and data initiatives. Cecilia is a graduate of the University of Washington School of Law and Boston College.

    Ernie Perez, MS

    Associate Provost and Executive Director, Medical Campus Information Technology

    Boston University

    Ernie currently serves as the Associate Provost and Executive Director of Boston University Medical Campus Information Technology. He leads the Boston University Medical Campus (BUMC) information technology team, including network infrastructure, systems, desktop support and service desk, application development and support, teaching and learning technologies, and research computing. The Medical Campus includes the Chobanian & Avedisian School of Medicine, Graduate Medical Sciences, School of Public Health, and the Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine.

    Katherine Chang Chretien, MD

    Associate Dean for Medical Student Affairs, Professor of Medicine

    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

    Katherine Chretien is Associate Dean for Medical Student Affairs and Director of Medical Student Wellness at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Katherine graduated from Brown University before attending the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where she graduated with Alpha Omega Alpha honors. She completed an internal medicine residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital.  Her academic focus has been on social media in medicine, medical education, narrative medicine, and well-being.  Prior roles include President of Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM), Co-Chair of the AAMC Medical Student Civic Advocacy Workgroup, Chair of the Northeast Group on Student Affairs (NEGSA), and she is currently the NEGSA representative to the AAMC Committee on Student Affairs. She is the recipient of the Charles H. Griffith III Educational Research Award from CDIM and the Women Leaders in Medicine Award from the American Medical Students Association. Katherine is the author of the book "I Wish I Read This Book Before Medical School," that is focused on helping medical students thrive.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 01/23/2024

    Join us to equip yourself with the insights and tools needed to position yourself knowledgeably in conversations regarding AI’s place in medical education.

    Join us to equip yourself with the insights and tools needed to position yourself knowledgeably in conversations regarding AI’s place in medical education. Using the missions of medical education as our guide, we’ll navigate its opportunities throughout the continuum of medical education.

    Alison J. Whelan, MD, FAC

    Chief Academic Officer

    AAMC

    Alison J. Whelan, MD oversees efforts that prepare and assist deans, faculty leaders, educators, and future physicians for the challenges of 21st century academic medicine. She leads a staff that addresses critical medical school data, administrative, and operational issues; explores new models of successful mission alignment; focuses on key student and faculty issues; transforms current models of education and workforce preparation across the full continuum of medical education; and supports medical school accreditation activities. 

    Prior to joining the association in 2016 as Chief Medical Education Officer, Dr. Whelan served as Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. She held multiple education roles: course director, clerkship director, curriculum dean and ultimately was appointed the inaugural Senior Associate Dean for Education. In this role she oversaw the continuum of medical education from medical school admissions through CME. 

    Dr. Whelan received her bachelor’s degree from Carleton College in 1981. She earned her medical degree from Washington University in 1986 and completed her postgraduate work and residency at the former Barnes Hospital, now Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Dr. Whelan is an internist and clinical geneticist.

    Marc Triola, MD, FACP

    Associate Dean for Educational Informatics

    NYU Langone Health

    Marc Triola, MD, is a professor of medicine, the associate dean for educational informatics, and the founding director of the Institute for Innovations in Medical Education (IIME) at NYU Grossman School of Medicine.  IIME combines education strategies with new informatics solutions to connect patient care and education at NYU Langone in a research and innovation initiative that is translational, empowers transformational change in our school, and benefits our patients. Dr. Triola’s research focuses on the use of AI tools to efficiently personalize education and give new insights to programs and coaches. His lab develops new learning technologies, AI-driven educational interventions, and defines educationally sensitive patient and system outcomes that can be used to assess training. 

    Stephanie Mann, MD, MS HPEd

    Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

    Methodist University/Cape Fear Valley Hospital School of Medicine