AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinar Series

The AAMC Building Better Curriculum monthly one-hour webinar series is an opportunity for curriculum deans, leaders, administrators, teaching faculty, and staff to learn about and explore innovations in curriculum and curriculum mapping. It also provides a venue for AAMC to provide updates on Curriculum Inventory developments. Attendees can see show demonstrations of new reports, preview upcoming publications, brainstorm issues related to gathering, entering, aggregating, reviewing, and reporting on curriculum data, and provide input regarding next steps in reports and publications. 

Registration is required.

  • AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinar - January 8, 2020

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Topic: Documenting Clinical Experience

    Documenting clerkships, especially documenting medical students' clinical experiences across clerkships is a challenging task for medical educators and curricular office’s administrators given the dynamic settings of these educational experiences. 

    This month’s Building Better Curriculum webinar series features how clinical experience mapping is effectively done at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

    If you would like to register for the entire series, please click here. Check back for additional webinars that are added to the series.

    Katie Maietta

    Assistant Director and Administrator, Office of Medical Education, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

    Katie serves the Office of Medical Education in a professional capacity by administering its administrative, instructional and research functions. This includes human resources and facilities management, monitoring and preparing projects, budgets, and instructional support.

    Katie graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a dual bachelor’s degree in Political Science and Italian Language and Literature.  She brings to OMED a broad range of experiences from her previous employment in the Honors College and the Department of Social Work, as well as extensive international travel.

  • AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinar - February 12, 2020

    Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 02/12/2020 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    Topics: Presentation 1: The Hidden Curriculum of Compassionate Care: Can Assessment Drive Compassion? Presentation 2: Project Wholehearted

    Presentation 1 Topic: The Hidden Curriculum of Compassionate Care: Can Assessment Drive Compassion

    Medical schools are expected to promote compassionate care among learners. Assessment is a key way to communicate values to learners but can create a hidden curriculum. Assessing compassionate care is challenging; however, not assessing it can communicate to students that such care is not valued. This presentation will describe a study that explored how current assessment strategies promote or suppress the idea that caring behaviors are valued learning objectives. 

    Presentation 2 Topic: Project Wholehearted 

    Learning to organize, collaborate and lead positive change within our immediate community is the essential rite of passage as physicians and community advocates. The students at New York Medical College (NYMC) recognizes that identifying and uplifting positive change within our own community will better enable us to contribute to societal healthcare justice or larger medical education reform in the future. Join the call to learn more about Project Wholehearted – an attempt to centralize humanism and compassion in medical education.  

    Please visit http://www.aamc.org/cir/webinars for a complete list of past and future events.

    If you would like to register for the entire series, please click here. Check back for additional webinars that are added to the series.

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    Sarah Wright
    Scientist, Michael Garron Hospital & Wilson Centre Assistant Professor, Dept. of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto

    Dr. Sarah Wright’s research program explores the (un)intended consequences of educational action that occurs in the intersections between assessment theory and practice. Her work is inspired and informed by a decade of experience as a psychometrician at Newcastle University Medical School (UK).  This practical experience has given her insight into how assessment frameworks can limit or support educational goals such as fostering compassionate practitioners or striving for social change. For example, she has combined psychometric and critical approaches to investigate the ways in which admissions policies often work to favour culturally and socially privileged medical students, thereby limiting attempts to improve student diversity. Through improved understanding of how emerging education goals transpire within existing education structures, her research seeks to improve education practice.

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    Victoria Boyd
    PhD Student, Health Professions Education, University of Toronto

    Victoria Boyd is a PhD student in health professions education research at the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, in collaboration with the Wilson Centre, University of Toronto. She completed a Master of Professional Communication from Ryerson University and an Honours Bachelor of Arts in English and Sociology from the University of Toronto. Informed by critical theory and critical pedagogy, Victoria’s doctoral research will explore if and how teaching health professionals to enact critically reflective practice influences practice outcomes and patient experiences for children with disabilities and chronic conditions who receive health services and supports at school.

    Suyu Zhang
    MD Candidate, Class of 2021, New York Medical College

    Suyu Zhang is a medical student at New York Medical College. Suyu serves as the Vice President of the Student Senate and helped start Project Wholehearted, a student-driven school-wide collaborative initiative aimed at catalyzing positive change in our medical school community. Through his time in medical school, Suyu hopes to develop critical thinking and clinical skills that will help shape a career of patient-centered innovation: better shaping medical care to effectively treat individual illnesses whilst designing and implementing policy changes that improve community health outcomes.

    Jessica McMillin
    MD Candidate, Class of 2022, New York Medical College

    Jess graduated from Amherst College in 2015 with a degree in Anthropology while completing pre-medical studies. She worked for three years in public health on a grant to increase equitable access to food and exercise in Environmental Justice populations in rural Massachusetts. As a medical student at New York Medical College (NYMC), she is interested in pursuing primary care with a public health and social justice lens. In her capacity as Resiliency Program Co-Coordinator and Humans of NYMC Co-Director, Jess seeks to foster community resilience and care in an effort to create a movement of students dedicated to humanizing medical education and beyond.

  • AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinar - April 8, 2020

    Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 04/08/2020 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Topic: Enhancing Integration through Team Teaching

    Topic: Enhancing Integration through Team Teaching

    Enhanced integration of basic and clinical sciences at the session level promotes meaningful knowledge connections for increased retrieval in clinical settings.  In this session, participants will learn about team teaching models and how to apply them to achieve enhanced session-level integration.  Facilitators will introduce an integration rubric as a tool to evaluate and improve upon session-level integration.  Facilitators will introduce strategies to enhance cognitive integration by optimizing the design and delivery of key content.  In addition, facilitators will explore the challenges and solutions to implementing team teaching in integrated curricula.    

    Session Objectives: 

    Participants will be able to:

    • Differentiate the levels of integration within curricula, courses, and individual sessions. 
    • Articulate the need for enhanced integration and the role of team teaching in achieving cognitive integration. 
    • Map current practices and new ideas to the integration rubric.   

    Please visit http://www.aamc.org/cir/webinars for a complete list of past and future events. 

    If you would like to register for the entire series, please click here. Check back for additional webinars that are added to the series.

    Amber J. Heck

    Associate Professor of Physiology at the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine

    Dr. Amber J. Heck is an Associate Professor of Physiology at the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine. She earned her Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences at UNTHSC. Her current responsibilities include curriculum design and development, and active learning facilitation in cell biology and physiology for medical students. She has nine years of experience as a facilitator using multiple learning modalities within integrated preclinical medical education curricula. She has three years of experience developing integrated active learning courses and has been founding faculty at two new medical schools. Dr. Heck’s current interests include creating faculty development interventions where participants develop tangible solutions to challenges imposed by modern medical school curriculum practices. She has been active in IAMSE for six years and has presented two focus sessions, one oral presentation, and four poster presentations at the IAMSE annual meetings. She is involved in research and mentoring nationally and internationally and was a 2016 IAMSE fellow. Dr. Heck currently serves as Chair of the IAMSE Educational Scholarship Committee and serves on the IAMSE Board of Directors.

    Amanda J. Chase

    Associate Professor of Medical Education at Nova Southeastern University College of Allopathic Medicine

    Dr. Amanda J. Chase is an Associate Professor of Medical Education at Nova Southeastern University College of Allopathic Medicine. She earned her Ph.D. in Cellular and Molecular Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She has seven years of experience facilitating in integrated medical curricula and has taken part in the development and implementation of curriculum and assessment at two new medical schools. Her approach to facilitation is problem-centered, in which she engages learners by asking questions, designing integrative activities, and developing case-based scenarios for small group discussion. Dr. Chase’s research interests center on the integration of communication into the preclinical years to increase learner proficiency with the application of biomedical knowledge to clinical practice. She participates in faculty development with a focus on course design and the implementation of case-based instructional methods to integrate the basic and applied sciences.