AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinar Series

The AAMC Building Better Curriculum webinar series is an opportunity for curriculum deans, leaders, administrators, teaching faculty, and staff to learn about and explore innovations in curriculum and curriculum mapping. It also provides a venue for AAMC to provide updates on Curriculum Inventory developments. 

In addition to the contents that are included in this regular programming package, we occasionally host special learning series that require separate registration. For a complete list of future events and for special programming registration, please visit the AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinars webpage.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 03/20/2024 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    In this session we will share one medical school's process for going from "unsatisfactory" to "satisfactory" for LCME element 8.4 specific to aggregating outcomes to ensure students achieve all EPOs. Additionally, we will share tips for sustainability that go beyond accreditation compliance.

    Medical schools must evaluate if students achieve education program objective (EPO) and address suboptimal EPO performance. Thus, assessment performance must be tracked at the EPO level. Each EPO is measured with different assessment types and outcomes (narrative, %, points) so aggregating EPO performance is difficult. In this session we will share one medical school's process for going from "unsatisfactory" to "satisfactory" for LCME element 8.4 specific to aggregating outcomes to ensure students achieve all EPOs. Additionally, we will share tips for sustainability that go beyond accreditation compliance.

    The AAMC is committed to providing inclusive sessions for all learners/participants. All sessions will be close-captioned. Please contact Kaitlyn at curriculum@aamc.org to request additional accommodations.

    Please visit the AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinars webpage for a complete list of events and special programming.

    Jorie Colbert-Getz, PhD, MS

    Assistant Dean of Education Quality Improvement Institution

    Spencer Fox Eccles School of Medicine at the University of Utah

    Dr. Colbert-Getz's scholarly work focuses on validity frameworks and other elements of assessment utility, survey design, and program evaluation. Dr. Colbert-Getz received her MS degree in Psychology from Illinois State University and her PhD degree in Educational Psychology from the University of Utah.

    Rachel Bonnett

    Associate Director of Education Quality Improvement Institution

    Spencer Fox Eccles School of Medicine at the University of Utah

    Rachel Bonnett's work in curriculum evaluation and quality improvement has focused on student feedback, academic performance and faculty research collaborations.  She received her BA from California State University, Fullerton.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 02/28/2024

    This webinar will present experiences in implementing a required 4-year longitudinal service-learning course at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, including challenges and successes as they relate to establishing community partnerships, curriculum development, and learner assessment.

    Service learning is used in medical education to foster community partnerships, prepare students to care for underserved communities, and deepen the understanding of how social and structural determinants of health can be addressed. The Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) recommends that medical schools provide “sufficient opportunities for, encourage, and support medical student participation in S-L and community service activities;" however, implementation varies among institutions, ranging from extracurricular programs and electives to formal curricula. We will present our experience implementing a required 4-year longitudinal service-learning course at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, including our challenges and successes as they relate to establishing community partnerships, curriculum development, and learner assessment. We will include perspectives from students, community partners, educational leadership, and our service-learning team. Participants will leave with ideas for implementation at their own institutions and opportunities for future collaboration and networking.

    The AAMC is committed to providing inclusive sessions for all learners/participants. All sessions will be close-captioned. Please contact Kaitlyn at curriculum@aamc.org to request additional accommodations.

    Please visit the AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinars webpage for a complete list of events and special programming.

    Lauren Roth, MD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
    Service Learning Course Director
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine

    Dr. Roth is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and inaugural director of the Service Learning Course at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She received the Award for Innovation in Medical Student Education from Einstein in 2022 and recently received the National Board of Medical Educators (NBME) Emerging Innovators Grant for her work developing a 360-assessment tool for Service Learning.

    Holly Nuthmann, LMSW

    Service Learning Program Manager
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine

    Holly Nuthmann is a social worker and the inaugural Program Manager of the Service Learning Course at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Prior to working at Einstein, Holly has worked in a variety of nonprofit settings and serves as the connection point between Einstein and the community organizations that serve as key partners in the Service Learning Program.

    Janice Thomas John, DO, MS, MPH

    Assistant Dean for Integrated Medical Education
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine

    Janice Thomas John is the Assistant Dean for Integrated Medical Education at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She oversees the longitudinal courses at Einstein including the Service Learning Course, and she has extensive teaching and leadership experience in health equity, community engagement, and curricular innovation.

    Alexandra Hoffman, MD Candidate

    Medical Student, Class of 2026
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine

    Alexandra (Ali) Hoffman is a rising third year medical student at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She is part of the class of 2026, which is the inaugural class that participated in Einstein’s new required Service Learning Course. Through Service Learning, Ali played an active role in launching a Bronx chapter of Achilles International, a global organization that provides athletic programs and social connection for people with disabilities.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 12/13/2023

    The session highlights both past and current Regional Medical Campus (RMC) models and national trends providing valuable insights into the current landscape of RMCs in the United States.

    The session highlights both past and current Regional Medical Campus (RMC) models and national trends providing valuable insights into the current landscape of RMCs in the United States. Session participants will learn through the lens of Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM) RMC model. Dr. Ryan will present IUSM’s model, showcasing its unique features and over 50-year history of innovation and a systems approach to deploying medical education across Indiana (one school with 9 campuses). She will discuss IUSM curriculum structure, its strengths and adaptability, highlighting special programs and implementation strategies putting theory into practice. The webinar concludes with a discussion on utilizing lessons learned from aspects of IUSM's structure and systems approach to enhance participant’s home institution programs, practices locally.

    By the end of the session participants will be able to:

    • Define various RMC models (past and present).
    • Discuss the IUSM model structure, strengths, and adaptability.
    • Discuss the deployment of IUSM’s curriculum structure and special program highlights.
    • Discuss with participants lessons learned from IUSM’s structure/systems approach and applicability at their home institutions.

    The AAMC is committed to providing inclusive sessions for all learners/participants. All sessions will be close-captioned. Please contact Kaitlyn at curriculum@aamc.org to request additional accommodations.

    Please visit the AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinars webpage for a complete list of events and special programming.

    Elizabeth R. Ryan, EdD

    Associate Dean for Educational Integration and Professor of Clinical Family Medicine, Department of Family Medicine

    Elizabeth Ryan, EdD, Associate Dean for Educational Integration at Indiana University School of Medicine, earned her MEd and EdD through Loyola University of Chicago in Curriculum and Instruction. She has held leadership roles within the AAMC in the GEA, CGEA and currently serves on the steering committee of the GRMC.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 10/11/2023

    The presentation will focus on stakeholder engagement, feedback gathering, and crafting and answering the philosophical questions needed to move forward towards a curriculum of the future.

    Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell (ZSOM) recognizes the need to continuously evolve and adapt to the changing landscape and believes that a cutting-edge curriculum is essential for the growth and success of the institution and its students. With that spirit in mind, ZSOM has embarked on a journey to renew its curriculum to meet the needs of the physician of 2035 and beyond. Dr. Ginzburg will describe the journey to date: Foundation Setting, Phase I and the beginning of Phase II. The presentation will focus on stakeholder engagement, feedback gathering, and crafting and answering the philosophical questions needed to move forward towards a curriculum of the future.

    The AAMC is committed to providing inclusive sessions for all learners/participants. All sessions will be close-captioned. Please contact Kaitlyn at curriculum@aamc.org to request additional accommodations.

    Please visit the AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinars webpage for a complete list of events and special programming.

    Samara Ginzburg, MD

    Vice Dean and Dean for Education
    Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine Hofstra/Northwell

    Samara B. Ginzburg, MD, graduated magna cum laude in Biopsychology from the University of Michigan, and earned her MD, completed residency in Internal Medicine, and fellowship in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism all at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Dr. Ginzburg is the Vice Dean and Dean for Education at the Zucker School of Medicine and a founding member of the leadership team that established the medical school.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/13/2023

    This session will explore the power of the human connection in medicine.

    This session will explore the power of the human connection in medicine. We will discuss how to develop communication skills in learners that move beyond collecting a history to connecting with a person and their lived experiences. We will discuss ways to consider contextual factors in patients’ lives that can improve care and avoid “contextual errors.” We will learn about research on “empathic listening” and its effects on clinicians and patients. We will hear about medical students incorporating patients’ life stories in the medical chart through the My Life, My Story program.

    The AAMC is committed to providing inclusive sessions for all learners/participants. All sessions will be close-captioned. Please contact Kaitlyn at curriculum@aamc.org to request additional accommodations.

    Please visit the AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinars webpage for a complete list of events and special programming.

    Mara Feingold-Link, MD

    Dr. Mara Feingold-Link went to medical school at Brown University. She completed her internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital where she was first introduced to the My Life, My Story project at the Boston VA. She came back to Brown for her hospice and palliative medicine fellowship, and she now works as a palliative care physician at the Lifespan Cancer Institute at Brown and as the associate program director for Brown's HPM fellowship.

    Rachel Kishton, MD, MSHP

    Dr. Rachel Kishton is a dual-boarded Family Medicine and Psychiatry physician. She completed residency at the University of Cincinnati and then a Masters in Health Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania. Currently at Penn she works to improve the integration of mental health care into the larger medical system.

    Saul J. Weiner, MD

    Dr. Saul Weiner is a medicine-pediatrics physician and health services researcher in the UIC College of Medicine, where he also served as senior associate dean for educational affairs. He is a graduate of Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, and is a former Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar.

    John Ragsdale, MD, MS

    Dr. John Ragsdale is the UME Cross-Continuum Consultant for the AAMC, assisting with strategic initiatives across the continuum of medical education. At the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, he is the Assistant Dean for Clinical Education and the Director of Clinical Education Faculty Development. He practices as an internal medicine hospitalist.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/16/2023

    In this session, we will examine the growing need to improve nutrition competence in medical education.

    In this session, we will examine the growing need to improve nutrition competence in medical education. We will discuss the national conversations about nutrition education, including the White House’s Strategy on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health and the recent Summit on Medical Education in Nutrition, hosted by ACGME, AAMC, and AACOM. We will hear from educational leaders in this area, involving both undergraduate and graduate medical education, and learn about opportunities to include nutrition education within the curriculum for medical students and residents.

    The AAMC is committed to providing inclusive sessions for all learners/participants. All sessions will be close-captioned. Please contact Kaitlyn at curriculum@aamc.org to request additional accommodations.

    Please visit the AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinars webpage for a complete list of events and special programming.

    Chris D'Adamo, Ph.D.

    Dr. Chris D’Adamo is an epidemiologist and Assistant Professor with dual appointments in the Departments of Family & Community Medicine and Epidemiology & Public Health at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He serves as the Director of the Center for Integrative Medicine and as a Fellow at the Nova Institute for Health.

    Lisa Howley, Ph.D., M.Ed.

    Senior Director, Transforming Medical Education

    AAMC

    Lisa Howley is an Educational Psychologist and Senior Director for Transforming Medical Education at the Association of American Medical Colleges. She joined the AAMC in 2016 and currently leads a diverse portfolio and multiple teams to advance the continuum of medical education, support experiential learning, and curricular transformation across its member institutions and their clinical partners. Under her leadership and vision, the long-standing national initiative FRAHME (pronounced ‘frame’) was born and built which is designed to realize the Fundamental Role of Arts and Humanities at improving the practice, education, and wellbeing of medical learners and practicing physicians. Prior to her national role, she spent eight years as the Associate DIO and AVP of Medical Education and Physician Development for Carolinas HealthCare System, one of the largest independent academic medical centers in the U.S. In that role, she led several medical education initiatives across the professional development continuum, including graduate medical education accreditation, as well as physician leadership development for the large integrated healthcare system. She holds an adjunct faculty appointment at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. She began her career as a member of the medical education faculty at the University of Virginia School of Medicine where she designed and led performance-based assessments and simulation-enhanced curricula. She received her bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Central Florida, and both her M.Ed. and Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from the University of Virginia.

    Stutee Khandelwal MD, MPH

    Stutee Khandelwal is a board-certified Internist with specialty interest in nutrition education for physicians and patients as well as public health nutrition. She has extensive research experience and publications as first author. Stutee is a teaching scholar with UCSF and has won a teaching award as well. She runs workshops on motivational interviewing for physicians-in-training. Stutee is passionate about educating the community on food as medicine. Her latest interest is in alternative medicine, especially mind-body medicine, and practices daily meditation. Most recently, she served as a Asst. Medical Director of the COVID Equity Project at UCSF Fresno, where they provided free, equitable, and community-based testing for COVID19. Her hobbies include cooking, dancing, and art and she is fluent in Hindi and English.

    John Ragsdale, MD, MS

    Dr. John Ragsdale is the UME Cross-Continuum Consultant for the AAMC, assisting with strategic initiatives across the continuum of medical education. At the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, he is the Assistant Dean for Clinical Education and the Director of Clinical Education Faculty Development. He practices as an internal medicine hospitalist.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 04/19/2023

    The presentation will broadly outline the evidence base supporting the growing global public health threat of human-induced climate change and the impetus for literacy initiatives in medical education.

    This is an introductory presentation to the current landscape of student-led initiatives in the field of climate change and health education in medical school curricula. The presentation will broadly outline the evidence base supporting the growing global public health threat of human-induced climate change and the impetus for literacy initiatives in medical education. The presenters, who are learners and trainees themselves, will then discuss student-led initiatives and resources to pursue longitudinal curriculum innovation as well as salient case studies to exemplify this work. Presenters include the leaders of Medical Students for a Sustainable Future, the Planetary Health Report Card, and Climate Resources for Health Education. The webinar will conclude with calls to action for the audience to take a stand on this vital issue at local and national medical institutions.

    The AAMC is committed to providing inclusive sessions for all learners/participants. All sessions will be close-captioned. Please contact Kaitlyn at curriculum@aamc.org to request additional accommodations.

    Please visit the AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinars webpage for a complete list of events and special programming.

    Savita Potarazu

    MS4SF Executive Chair and MD/MPH Candidate at The George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences, Class of 2024

    As the current Executive Chair of MS4SF, in her second term, Savita is committed to promoting environmental justice in the climate action initiatives this organization undertakes. She has co-led the newly established Climate Change and Human Health MD Program curriculum theme. Savita plans on applying into OBGYN for residency and is incredibly passionate about the intersectionality of reproductive health, climate change, and environmental justice. Prior to her role as Executive Chair, she served as one of the Climate Smart Health Care co-chairs for MS4SF. Her organizational priorities for 2023 include expanding student representation to regions new to climate change and health, collaborating with professional medical societies on shared priorities in climate action to amplify student voices, and leading the organization’s transition to a 501(c)3 non-profit organization.

    Taylor Brewer

    MS4SF Vice Chair, MD Candidate at The George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences, Class of 2024

    Taylor’s interest in environmental health, climate change, and related social justice began young and was fostered through a BA in Environmental Studies and a BS in Biology at The George Washington University. She served as GW Medical School’s Climate Health Interest Group president in addition to co-pioneering GW SMHS’s Climate Change and Human Health curricula theme. Pediatric oriented, she also has a special interest to integrate climate health principles into child healthcare to create a longitudinal mutually beneficial relationship.

    Douglas Fritz

    MS4SF Vice Chair

    Douglas currently serves as a Vice Chair for MS4SF. Additionally he leads sustainability efforts as an MD/PhD Student at the University of Colorado. Douglas knows climate change, social justice, and health are increasingly connected, and he expects our medical schools to be on the forefront of addressing it.

    Douglas knows climate change, social justice, and health are increasingly connected, and he expects our medical schools to be on the forefront of addressing it. While his work as a Vice Chair for MS4SF is focused on addressing these expectations nationally, as a MD/PhD student in Colorado, his research interests trace the intersections of infectious disease and the climate crisis. he works with local community members to addresses heat-stress in Denver and leads a fantastic team of residents, fellows, and med students sustainability initiatives on campus.. passionate about interweaving climate change more deeply into med school curricula and elevating what physicians can to address the climate crisis.

    Harleen Marwah

    Harleen Marwah, MD MS, is a pediatric resident at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and was the founding chair of Medical Students for a Sustainable Future (MS4SF), a community of 500+ medical trainees across 100+ medical schools who recognize the urgency of the climate crisis on health. They combine the spark of youth activism and the perspective of medicine to advocate for policies that protect patients. She was selected as a 2021 Grist 50 Fixer and earned the 2020 Health Care Without Harm Emerging Physician Leader Award in recognition of her work founding and leading MS4SF Prior to medical school, Dr. Marwah earned her M.S. in Global Medicine and B.S. in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention from the University of Southern California. She has represented health and intergenerational equity stakeholders at the United Nations COP20 in Lima, Peru and the COP21 in Paris, France.

    Natasha Sood

    Founder & Project Director, Climate Resources for Health Education (CRHE)

    Natasha Sood is a fourth-year medical student at Penn State College of Medicine. She is the Founder and Project Director of the Climate Resources for Health Education (CRHE) initiative at the Global Consortium on Climate and Health Education (GCCHE).

    Taylor Diedrich

    Taylor is a third-year medical student at Indiana University School of Medicine. She is the Co-Director and former Implementation & Analytics Chair (2020-22) of the Planetary Health Report Card.

    Julia Malits

    MD MPH Candidate at Harvard Medical School and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    Julia is a fourth-year MD MPH student at Harvard Medical School and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.  As a co-leader of Students for Environmental Awareness in Medicine at Harvard Medical School, she and her peers have led the integration of climate health content into the medical curriculum.

    Madhu Manivannan

    MD candidate (expected graduation: 2024)

    Madhu Manivannan is a 4th year medical student at Emory University School of Medicine. She serves as co-president of the student organization Medical Students for Climate Action, and is currently working on projects related to implementing climate education into the medical school curriculum. Her other interests include climate justice & advocacy, health inequities, and the intersection of climate change on maternal and fetal health outcomes.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 03/08/2023

    Please join us for a free interactive webinar to learn from and with educators about integrating women's health into health professions education.

    Please join us for a free interactive webinar to learn from and with educators about integrating women's health into health professions education. Drs Janice Werbinski, C. Noel Bairey Merz, and Beth L. Abramson will be sharing and discussing their curricular works. Dr Abramson will describe this curriculum.

    This thematic session is designed to highlight several innovative approaches to teaching and learning and is offered as a supplement to our long-standing Building Better Curriculum series for health professional curriculum leaders. This is open to all healthcare professionals at no cost.

    The AAMC is committed to providing inclusive sessions for all learners/participants. All sessions will be close-captioned. Please contact Kaitlyn at curriculum@aamc.org to request additional accommodations.

    Please visit the AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinars webpage for a complete list of events and special programming.

    Janice Werbinski, MD, FACOG

    Immediate Past President, American Medical Women's Association
    Clinical Associate Professor Emerita, Western Michigan University’s Homer R Stryker, MD School of Medicine

    C. Noel Bairey Merz, MD, FACC, FAHA, FESC

    Director, Barbra Streisand Women's Heart Center
    Director, Linda Joy Pollin Women's Heart Health Program
    Director, Erika J. Glazer Women's Heart Research Initiative
    Director, Preventive Cardiac Center
    Professor of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

    Beth L. Abramson, MD, MSc, FRCP, FACC

    Paul Albrechtsen Professor in Cardiac Prevention and Women's Health
    Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto

    Sneha Michaela Chaturvedi

    MD/PhD Student, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
    Medical Student Chair, Sex and Gender Health Collaborative, American Medical Women's Association

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 02/15/2023

    One in four persons in the US self-identify as having a disability. However, disability prevalence was reported as 4.6% of medical students in 2019, and 3.1% of physicians in 2021. Although many health leadership organizations have expressed a commitment to include learners with disabilities, many programs have not implemented best practices for curricular design and inclusive and accessible instruction to meet these heterogeneous needs.

    All webinar sessions include closed captions.

    One in four persons in the US self-identify as having a disability.1 However, disability prevalence was reported as 4.6% of medical students in 2019,2 and 3.1% of physicians in 2021.3  Although many health leadership organizations have expressed a commitment to include learners with disabilities (LWD), many programs have not implemented best practices for curricular design and inclusive and accessible instruction to meet the heterogeneous needs of LWD.4,5  

    Accessibility best practices that need to be fully implemented include: captioning and providing transcripts of videos and lectures; providing alt text for images and diagrams; using proper color contrast in presentation materials; leaving blank space at the bottom of slides for captions; proactively posting materials in advance and recording didactic sessions for learners to access subsequently; and more.5 Common accessibility barriers in clinical settings include: incompatibility of dictation or speech-to-text software with EMR systems, reluctance to request excused absences for necessary medical appointments, needs for alterations in schedule or location, and more. As value is placed on accessibility, a welcoming message is sent to LWD that: their needs are important, they are expected to be part of the cohort, and they belong. This strong commitment to accessibility enhances an inclusive learning environment.      

    References:
    1. Okoro, C. A., Hollis, N. D., Cyrus, A. C., & Griffin-Blake, S. (2018). Prevalence of disabilities and health care access by disability status and type among adults—United States, 2016. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 67(32), 882.|
    2. Meeks, L. M., Case, B., Herzer, K., Plegue, M., & Swenor, B. K. (2019). Change in prevalence of disabilities and accommodation practices among US medical schools, 2016 vs 2019. JAMA, 322(20), 2022-2024.
    3. Nouri Z, Dill MJ, Conrad SS, Moreland CJ, Meeks LM. Estimated prevalence of US physicians with disabilities. JAMA network open. 2021 Mar 1;4(3):e211254-.
    4. Petersen KH, Sheets, Z, Singh, S., Jawadi, Z, Michael, D, Meeks, LM. Inclusive medicine and medical education: increasing the number of clinicians with disabilities. Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Global Public Health. Feb 2022. doi: https://doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780190632366.013.290
    5. Petersen KH. Increasing Accessibility Through Inclusive Instruction and Design. In Disability as Diversity 2020 (pp. 143-173). Springer, Cham. 

    Please visit the AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinars webpage for a complete list of events and special programming.

    Kristina H. Petersen, PhD

    Assistant Dean of Academic Support Programs and Associate Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

    New York Medical College

    Dr. Petersen's scholarly work primarily focuses on inclusive instruction, course accessibility, and supporting students with disabilities. In 2022, she received an award for Excellence in Scholarly Work from the Coalition for Disability Access in Health Science Education before beginning her two-year term as president, and she also received the AAMC/AOA Robert J. Glaser Distinguished Teaching Award.

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 01/18/2023

    Language is the principal tool that clinicians use in providing healthcare. Populations with non- English language preferences (NELP) are more likely to experience health inequities, such as worse clinical outcomes and less satisfaction with care compared to English-speaking patients.

    Language is the principal tool that clinicians use in providing healthcare. Populations with non- English language preferences (NELP) are more likely to experience health inequities, such as worse clinical outcomes and less satisfaction with care compared to English-speaking patients. Additionally, the standard use of language in healthcare communication may be ineffective for patients with sensory or cognitive impairments.

    Despite known benefits and needs, there is a paucity of existing published educational materials and curricula that teach students and practitioners how to provide equitable patient-centered language-appropriate care. To improve the healthcare of populations with NELP and with sensory or cognitive impairments, MedEdPORTAL launched the Language-Appropriate Health Care and Medical Language Collection (https://www.mededportal.org/language).

    This session aims to orient attendees to the collection and encourage them to submit their educational scholarship by providing submission guidelines and specific examples.

    Please visit the AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinars webpage for a complete list of future events and special programming.

    Débora H. Silva Díaz MD, M.Ed.

    Professor of Pediatric Hospital Medicine at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine

    Dr. Débora H. Silva-Díaz is a tenured Professor of Pediatric Hospital Medicine at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine with more than 20 years of experience in medical education. Born in Mexico and raised in Puerto Rico, she completed a BA in Clinical Psychology at Tufts University, an MD and General Pediatrics Residency Program at the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, a fellowship in Primary Care Faculty Development at Michigan State University, and a Master’s in Education at the University of Cincinnati. She has served, among others, as director of the Clinical Skills Program, Curriculum Office, Faculty Development Program, Office of Accreditation, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and is the past Interim Dean for Academic Affairs of the University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus. In these positions, she developed, implemented, and revised multiple bilingual curricula including a longitudinal clinical and communication skills curriculum for medical students. She has also served as a consultant, locally, nationally, and internationally, developing and revising curricula, both in English and Spanish.

    Pilar Ortega, MD, MGM

    Vice President of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education

    Clinical Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois Chicago Departments of Emergency Medicine and Medical Education

    Dr. Pilar Ortega is Vice President of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). She also holds a faculty appointment as clinical assistant professor at the University of Illinois Chicago (UIC) Departments of Emergency Medicine and Medical Education. At UIC, Dr. Ortega created the inaugural Medical Spanish program for the College of Medicine, which she taught for 9 years and has become a prototype for medical language education nationwide. She also developed a longitudinal course to prepare all medical students to effectively communicate with linguistically diverse populations. Dr. Ortega completed her undergraduate degree in philosophy at the Johns Hopkins University, her medical degree at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, emergency medicine residency at the University of Chicago, and a master’s degree in graphic medicine from the Universidad Internacional de Andalucía.

    Dr. Ortega grew up bilingual, learning Spanish at home and English at school. Her educational and research agendas focus on effective language-concordant and cross-linguistic health communication. Dr. Ortega wrote the textbook and clinical case book in the series, Spanish and the Medical Interview, and is the Founder and President of the non-profit organization, the National Association of Medical Spanish (NAMS). She is also Co-Founder and Immediate-Past President of the Medical Organization for Latino Advancement (MOLA), a non-profit professional organization that aims to improve health equity, diversity, and inclusion in healthcare. Dr. Ortega has published extensively on medical language education, assessment, and language-appropriate health policy and has given over 100 national and international presentations through organizations such as the American Medical Association, the ACGME, the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Latino Medical Student Association, the National Hispanic Medical Association, the International Congress of the Spanish Language, and the International Conference on Communication in Healthcare.