Graduate STEM Education for the 21st Century - December 17

Includes a Live Event on 12/17/2018 at 1:00 PM (EST)

The 2018 National Academies report “Graduate STEM Education for the 21st Century” explores how well the current US STEM graduate education system is meeting the full array of scientific needs in the 21st century. This report analyzes factors that have affected the training of scientists:

  • How innovations in research methods and technologies have changes
  • Changes in the nature of STEM work 
  • Shifts in demographics
  • Expansions in the scope of occupations needing STEM expertise

Please join study director Layne Scherer as she further summarizes the key findings of the report and focuses on the implementation of two essential recommendations: 1) creating an incentive structure that supports quality mentoring and 2) building an institutional culture that values a full array of careers in the biomedical workforce. This webinar will also feature examples of institutional implementation of these two recommendations from Indiana University School of Medicine and University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Webinar participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and share their experiences with the presenters and with each other throughout the presentation.

Speaker: 

Layne Scherer
Program Officer; Board on Higher Education and Workforce
NASEM

This is the second part of the series “The Impact and Implementation of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine 2018 Reports on the Biomedical and Medical Workforce.” If you would like information on the full series, please click here.

Layne Scherer

Program Officer; Board on Higher Education and Workforce; NASEM

Layne Scherer served as the study director for the Committee on Revitalizing Graduate STEM Education for the 21st Century and is a program officer with the Board on Higher Education and Workforce at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Prior to joining the National Academies, Scherer was a science assistant at the National Science Foundation with the office of the Assistant Director for Education and Human Resources and served as an executive secretary under the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education. Scherer earned her master’s of public policy from the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan, with a focus on education policy, nonprofit management, and quantitative analysis.

Components visible upon registration.