AAMC Building Better Curriculum Webinar - May 13, 2020


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Presentation 1: Teaching Medical Students to Identify, Understand, and Engage in Reporting Medical Errors

This presentation describes a curriculum at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth for teaching medical students to identify, understand, and engage in reporting medical errors, which is situated in their third-year clerkship in internal medicine.  We will describe the design, context, and evaluation of the curriculum.  Additionally, we will show how it is currently taught (with examples of the cases students write about and illuminate through peer dialogue) and conclude with a perspective on the components of a successful patient safety curriculum for medical students.  There will be time at the end of the presentation for questions and comments about best practices, as well as ideas for teaching patient safety to medical students at the end of the presentation.  

Presentation 2: Outcomes of a Longitudinal Quality Improvement and Patient Safety Pre-clerkship Curriculum

This presentation describes a study that evaluated whether quality improvement (QI) and patient safety (PS) training in pre-clerkship medical education resulted in students’ development and retention of knowledge, application-based and perceived skills, and attitudes throughout clerkships. A longitudinal QI/PS curriculum with multimodal curricular components was implemented in the pre-clerkship curriculum between 2015 and 2017 at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Rhode Island. Assessment of this curriculum model yielded findings that suggest the incorporation of pre-clerkship QI/PS training results in improvements in knowledge, application-based and perceived skills, and attitudes that are retained throughout clerkships.

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Joel Bradley, MD

Adult and Pediatric Hospitalist, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Dr. Bradley graduated from Williams College and University of Massachusetts School of Medicine with a passion for the humanities and education.  During his residency in internal medicine and pediatrics at Tufts/Maine Medical Center, his training extended to quality, safety, and clinical ethics, with a particular interest in combining them.  He currently works as an adult hospitalist at the White River Junction VAMC in Vermont, and for the Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth, where he teaches internal medicine and pediatric residents, and medical students throughout the preclinical and clinical years.  He is also an alumnus and faculty member of the VA Chief Residency in Quality and Safety Program, focused on national curriculum development with colleagues at the VA National Center for Patient Safety. 

Hilary F. Ryder, MD, MS, FACP, FHM, HEC-C

Associate Professor of Medicine, Medical Education and The Dartmouth Institute, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth; Director, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

Dr. Ryder graduated from the University of Chicago and Yale University School of Medicine. She completed her residency training at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center joining the Geisel School of Medicine faculty as a hospitalist in 2007.  She earned a Masters in Science through The Dartmouth Institute in 2012. Currently, Dr. Ryder is the Associate Professor of Medicine, Medical Education and The Dartmouth Institute at The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth in Hanover, New Hampshire.  She is also the Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency Program. Dr. Ryder has a special interest in medical education research.  She served as Medical Editor for SIMPLE, the most widely used on-line, case-based third-year medical clerkship curriculum.  She is the author of several papers focused on educating patients, providers and lay readers of scientific journals.  Her current work focuses on the meaning and role of assessments in undergraduate and graduate medical education, and understanding moral distress medical students face when encountering ethical dilemmas.  Dr. Ryder also mentors students and residents with interest in medical education research and is most proud of the papers she co-authors with learners.  She is active in the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM), and serves on the governing councils of Clerkship Directors of Internal Medicine (CDIM) and the Alliance for Clinical Education (ACE).

Greg Ogrinc, MD, MS

Senior Vice President Certification Standards and Programs, American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS)

Greg Ogrinc is the Senior Vice President, Certification Standards and Programs at the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS).  He provides strategic leadership for the ongoing evolution and implementation of ABMS board certification standards and programming. Before joining the ABMS in 2020, he was the Senior Associate Dean for Medical Education at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and Professor of Medicine and of the Dartmouth Institute.  Dr. Ogrinc graduated from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, residency in internal medicine at MetroHealth Medical Center, and the VA National Quality Scholars Program at WRJ VA.  Dr. Ogrinc is the lead author of the Fundamentals of Healthcare Improvement textbook and co-leader of the Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE) guidelines, a set of publication guidelines for sharing quality improvement work through published literature.

Luba Dumenco, MD, MEHP, FACP

Assistant Dean for Medical Education, Office of Medical Education and Continuous Quality Improvement, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

As Assistant Dean for Medical Education, Luba Dumenco is responsible for first year medical school curriculum and the horizontal and vertical integration across the four-year curriculum.  Dr. Dumenco is a course leader for a first year course, General Pathology, and a second year course, Hematology. Dr. Lumenco’s areas of interest include quality improvement and patient safety, interprofessional education, peer-review, and educational pedagogy. 

Kristina Monteiro, PhD

Director for Assessment and Evaluation, Office of Medical Education and Continuous Quality Improvement, The Warren Alpert School of Brown University

As Director of Assessment and Evaluation at AMS, Kristina Monteiro is responsible for evaluating the four-year medical school curriculum. Dr. Monteiro is also a course leader for the Research Methods in Population Medicine course in the Master of Science program and the Health Systems Science course in the MD program. Dr. Monteiro’s areas of interest include quality improvement and patient safety, interprofessional education, and collaborating with medical students by providing research design and statistical analysis support on their projects.

Components visible upon registration.